How to structure a presentation

– Posted in: Marketing, Presentations, Video

In this video, I show you how to give a presentations with confidence and power. With a little planning, rehearsal and a structured approach, it is possible for anyone to deliver a professional presentation.

Also, I show you how to deliver a marketing pitch that has clarity, credibility and relevance.

Barack Obama, Robin Williams and Jonathan Ross all got their success by talking to every increasing groups of people. Being able to talk with ease in front of a group of people is a useful skill for creating success in business.

There should be three sections to any presentation:
• Introduction (INTRO) — tell them what you are going to say
• Message (main body) — tell them
• Summary (including call to action) — tell them what you said

A structured “intro” and a concise summary are the marks of a professional presentation.

Presentation structure
There should be three sections to any presentation:
• Introduction (INTRO) – tell them what you are going to say
• Message (main body) – tell them
• Summary (including call to action) – tell them what you said

A structured ‘intro’ and a concise summary are the marks of a professional presentation.

The Introduction to a presentation
For me, a structured introduction is the most useful thing I have learnt about giving professional presentations. It gives me a powerful start and a foundation for an effective finish. It is the time to ‘set the scene’. This could just be a few sentences something more substantial. However, there are five aspects to an introduction or intro. (INTRO).

I. Interest:
Say something that will get their attention. A question is a very good starting point. A question, or two, will get people thinking and they will need to respond. Marketers and hypnotists refer to this as “opening a loop”. Alternatively, ask a question to which the audience would be likely to say “Yes”.
This is a good point to get people to put their hand up. The more frequently they agree with you the more likely you are to keep them engaged.

N. Need:
Why should they listen to you? How is it relevant to them? What problem or requirement do they have that you can solve or meet? If you make your subject relevant to your audience, they will decide for themselves that they need to listen to what you have to say.

T. Title:
The title of your presentation should really set the scene and link to what you have already said so far. A good example if to use a linking format like
“How to [behaviour] so you can [result]”
For instance “How to give a presentation with confidence and power so you can increase you income.”

R. Range:
People like to know what is going to happen in their near future. Not knowing what is coming their way can lead them to becoming distracted. By giving a short list of topics that you are going to talk about, and for how long you will be talking, you set your audience’s expectations and put people at ease.

O. Objectives:
What are your aims for your presentation? What do you want for your audience and for you?
Main body of presentation and summary.

With clear objectives and a structured introduction, the rest of the presentation is set up. After the “INTRO” you can deliver your message. Do this by opening and closing each topic, you said you would discuss (Range). If it is a marketing presentation, use the syntax below.

Once you have covered all the topics you can close the presentation with a summary. Just like the introduction explained what you were going say, the summary reminds your audience what you just told them and checks that you have met the objectives you stated in the introduction.

Lastly, you can take questions (be specific that you want questions not opinions) and finish with a powerful call to action and a ‘strap line’ that will leave a lasting impression. Then, after you have finished (if appropriate), you could have time for a ‘talking-shop’ where people can share their opinions and experiences.

Marketing syntax
1. With whom do you work? Who is your target market?
2. What problem do they have?
3. Why are you credible? What makes you the expert?
4. What process do you use?
5. What are the results (that solve their problems)?
6. What success stories do you have?
7. Lastly, as call to action (booking a conversation, etc.)

This structure enables you to create a marketing pitch that you will be able to deliver in a number of ways:

• A one minute ‘elevator’ pitch (yes, you can cover all seven in one minute!)
• A formal marketing presentation
• An impromptu conversation

The important thing is to cover each point, and the order does not really matter (as long as you discuss their problem before you explain how you can solve their problem).

Here is the same information again but in a live video. It was my first attempt at doing a video presentation that is longer than a few minutes. I look down at my notes quite a bit and move about too much but all the information you need is here. One take, no rehearsal – just a mind map.

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